General

AUDIO: Paul Heaton: Ched 'damaged' our club

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 12:39
Paul Heaton says Ched Evans has the "right" to play football again, but not for Sheffield United.
Categories: General

VIDEO: Highlights of Alex Salmond's career

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 11:54
On the day he steps down as First Minister, BBC archives re-trace Alex Salmond's career in UK and Scottish politics.
Categories: General

VIDEO: Final days of Rochester campaign

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 11:38
Voters go to the polls in the Rochester and Strood by-election on Thursday, prompted by the defection of its MP.
Categories: General

AUDIO: Can UK citizenship be stripped?

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 10:58
The Supreme Court will hear the case of a suspected Al Qaeda supporter which could determine the limits of the Home Secretary's power to strip British terror suspects of UK citizenship.
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AUDIO: Prisons 'understaffed and violent'

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 10:43
Prisons are becoming increasingly violent due to overcrowding and a shortage of staff, claims Chief Inspector of Prisons Nick Hardwick.
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VIDEO: Rural schools 'at risk of closure'

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 09:49
Schools in parts of Shropshire are at risk of closing because they do not have enough pupils, as Gillian Hargreaves reports.
Categories: General

VIDEO: Poor people 'will have fewer teeth'

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 09:44
Poor people are likely to have eight fewer teeth by the time they reach their seventies compared with the rich, according to researchers.
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VIDEO: Child exploitation 'is widespread'

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 08:12
Organised child sex abuse is widespread in England, a report by MPs on the Rotherham exploitation scandal says.
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VIDEO: Inside burned Mackintosh building

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 07:11
Colin Paterson reports on the search for treasures amongst the rubble at Glasgow School of Art which was wrecked by fire six months ago.
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VIDEO: Were there seven Birmingham bombs?

BBC test - Tue, 2014-11-18 03:43
On the 40th anniversary of the Birmingham Bombings the BBC speaks to the police, families and terrorism experts and asks if the case is any nearer to being solved.
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Birth, growth, decay and death in outer space: Scientists celebrate satellite's 10th birthday

24 Hour Museum - Tue, 2014-11-18 00:00
Scientists in Leicester have spent ten years being woken up or interrupted by Swift, a satellite which hurtles around the Earth monitoring explosive cosmic events. But its best discoveries could be yet to come.
Categories: General

Twitter's LoveTheatre day: Five UK museums where you can find theatre exhibits

24 Hour Museum - Tue, 2014-11-18 00:00
From the Prague Youth Theatre to the Royal Opera House, around 300 dramatic groups and venues are taking part in the inaugural LoveTheatre campaign on Twitter today.
Categories: General

Twitter's LoveTheatre day: Five UK museums where you can find theatre exhibits

24 Hour Museum - Tue, 2014-11-18 00:00
From the Prague Youth Theatre to the Royal Opera House, around 300 dramatic groups and venues are taking part in the inaugural LoveTheatre campaign on Twitter today.
Categories: General

Revealed: The feminist story of the women who set up First World War hospital in Russia

24 Hour Museum - Tue, 2014-11-18 00:00
Selina Lock, whose new story is included in a Graphic Anthology of the First World War, says her account of the Scottish Women's Hospital is an unrevealed tale from Russia.
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Birth, growth, decay and death in outer space: Scientists celebrate satellite's 10th birthday

24 Hour Museum - Tue, 2014-11-18 00:00
Scientists in Leicester have spent ten years being woken up or interrupted by Swift, a satellite which hurtles around the Earth monitoring explosive cosmic events. But its best discoveries could be yet to come.
Categories: General

Who would you pick as a Radical Hero? People's History Museum names list of 100

24 Hour Museum - Tue, 2014-11-18 00:00
Manchester's People's History Museum has picked suffragettes, rights activists, politicians and sportsmen on a list of 100 heroes who changed Britain.
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VIDEO: What does Japanese recession mean?

BBC test - Mon, 2014-11-17 23:54
The BBC's economics editor Robert Peston looks at what impact instability in the global economy could have in the UK.
Categories: General

VIDEO: Brands Hatch rogue driver jailed

BBC test - Mon, 2014-11-17 23:16
A man who drove his girlfriend's car on to the Brands Hatch circuit during a race is jailed for eight months.
Categories: General

Climate change was not to blame for the collapse of the Bronze Age

Heritage Daily - Mon, 2014-11-17 21:43
Scientists will have to find alternative explanations for a huge population collapse in Europe at the end of the Bronze Age as researchers prove definitively that climate change – commonly assumed to be responsible – could not have been the culprit.

Archaeologists and environmental scientists from the University of Bradford, University of Leeds, University College Cork, Ireland (UCC), and Queen’s University Belfast have shown that the changes in climate that scientists believed to coincide with the fall in population in fact occurred at least two generations later.

Their results, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that human activity starts to decline after 900BC, and falls rapidly after 800BC, indicating a population collapse. But the climate records show that colder, wetter conditions didn’t occur until around two generations later.

Fluctuations in levels of human activity through time are reflected by the numbers of radiocarbon dates for a given period. The team used new statistical techniques to analyse more than 2000 radiocarbon dates, taken from hundreds of archaeological sites in Ireland, to pinpoint the precise dates that Europe’s Bronze Age population collapse occurred.

The team then analysed past climate records from peat bogs in Ireland and compared the archaeological data to these climate records to see if the dates tallied. That information was then compared with evidence of climate change across NW Europe between 1200 and 500 BC.

“Our evidence shows definitively that the population decline in this period cannot have been caused by climate change,” says Ian Armit, Professor of Archaeology at the University of Bradford, and lead author of the study.

Graeme Swindles, Associate Professor of Earth System Dynamics at the University of Leeds, added, “We found clear evidence for a rapid change in climate to much wetter conditions, which we were able to precisely pinpoint to 750BC using statistical methods.”

According to Professor Armit, social and economic stress is more likely to be the cause of the sudden and widespread fall in numbers. Communities producing bronze needed to trade over very large distances to obtain copper and tin. Control of these networks enabled the growth of complex, hierarchical societies dominated by a warrior elite. As iron production took over, these networks collapsed, leading to widespread conflict and social collapse. It may be these unstable social conditions, rather than climate change, that led to the population collapse at the end of the Bronze Age.

According to Katharina Becker, Lecturer in the Department of Archaeology at UCC, the Late Bronze Age is usually seen as a time of plenty, in contrast to an impoverished Early Iron Age. “Our results show that the rich Bronze Age artefact record does not provide the full picture and that crisis began earlier than previously thought,” she says.

“Although climate change was not directly responsible for the collapse it is likely that the poor climatic conditions would have affected farming,” adds Professor Armit. “This would have been particularly difficult for vulnerable communities, preventing population recovery for several centuries.”

The findings have significance for modern day climate change debates which, argues Professor Armit, are often too quick to link historical climate events with changes in population.

“The impact of climate change on humans is a huge concern today as we monitor rising temperatures globally,” says Professor Armit.

“Often, in examining the past, we are inclined to link evidence of climate change with evidence of population change. Actually, if you have high quality data and apply modern analytical techniques, you get a much clearer picture and start to see the real complexity of human/environment relationships in the past.”

University of Bradford

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Categories: General

VIDEO: April Jones' killer's house torn down

BBC test - Mon, 2014-11-17 20:58
A demolition team has torn down a cottage dubbed the "house of hell", where Mark Bridger is believed to have murdered five-year-old April Jones.
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