Resources

Exploring the Wreck of the ROYAL CHARTER with Cotswold Archaeology

Heritage of Wales News - Mon, 2015-10-26 09:56
Recent accessions to the Royal Commission’s Digital Collections include a series of short video clips of the 2014 exploration of the famous Anglesey wreck by Cotswold Archaeology. The programme of work was undertaken on behalf of Cadw and included a multi-beam echosounder survey which identified small areas of iron wreckage still upstanding on the seabed.

Contemporary engraving of the ROYAL CHARTERThe ROYAL CHARTER was a Liverpool-registered steamship built at the Sandycroft Ironworks on the River Dee. In its time, it was a celebrated fast passenger ship sailing a regular service to Australia – each round trip circumnavigating the globe. On its last return trip to Liverpool, it was only a few hours from River Mersey when it was caught in a tremendous storm. The storm had the strength of a hurricane and eventually drove the ship ashore near Moelfre on Anglesey. In the hours that followed a terrible tragedy unfolded with the vast majority of the passengers (including families with young children) being drowned. A monument stands on the cliff above the site today.

Welsh mariners onboard whose lives were lost include Thomas Jones and William Davies of Caernarvon; Griffith Jones, carpenter, and John Rees of Nefyn; William Hughes of Amlwch; Henry Williams of Cemaes; John Jones of Holyhead; and Isaac Griffiths of Moelfre.

One of the gravestones commemorating victims in St Gallgo’s churchyard.Many of the dead were buried in the graveyard of St Gallgo’s Church, where Reverend Stephen Roose Hughes was the Rector. When Charles Dickens later visited the church, he wrote of the hundreds of letters Reverend Hughes had received inquiring about relatives and friends.

The archive service of the State of Victoria, Australia, has recently made available records of passengers arriving and embarking on ships for the port of Melbourne. These records include a list of passengers who were early confirmations for the ROYAL CHARTER’s last voyage. Notable amongst these are individuals and families whose graves can be seen today in the churchyard.

A short clip of underwater video and a copy of the last passenger list for the ROYAL CHARTER have been added to the resources created for the Great Storm of 1859 by the Royal Commission on the People’s Collection Wales.

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Categories: Resources

Ordnance Survey Large Print Collection

Heritage of Wales News - Fri, 2015-10-23 11:30
A significant proportion of the Aerial Photographic Collections within the National Monuments Record of Wales comprises large prints from the Ordnance Survey Aerial Mapping Programme. The prints are square format, measuring 30” x 30” (75x75cm) or more, dating from between 1962 and 2009. The large prints reveal an amazing level of ground detail.


A recent addition to the aerial photographic collections includes a significant number of large prints. However, a small number of photographs have no identification details on them. They cannot be included in our collections unless we know the area they cover.

Can you help us identify where this is? We believe it may have been taken in the early to middle part of the 1990s. To the left of the frame there is a straight section of main road, approaching the outskirts of a settlement. At the bottom corner there is a small industrial site, and a quarry located on the other side of the road. On the right-hand edge of the photograph there is a range of farm buildings, close to a house with a distinctive circular feature within the grounds – see the detailed view below.


If you know where this photograph was taken, please contact our offices.


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By Medwyn Parry

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Categories: Resources

Inspirational Archives: Come and be inspired by the Royal Commission’s archives 18 November, 12pm–7pm

Heritage of Wales News - Thu, 2015-10-22 08:38
As part of this year’s Explore your Archives campaign, the Royal Commission will be hosting Inspirational Archives: a programme of events designed to stimulate the creative use of our archives.

On Wednesday, 18 November 2015, we are holding an Open Day, inviting visitors to come and discover the many unique collections in our archives – and to be inspired to create something of their own.

The day will include creative workshops, and demonstrations on 3D modelling, reconstruction drawing, animations, photography, digital resources (LiDAR, GIS) and much more. In addition there will be exciting talks by the Royal Commission’s aerial investigator, Dr Toby Driver, on Patterns from the Past: The Wonders of the Aerial Archive and by its photographer, Iain Wright, on Through the Photographer’s Lens.


A selection of work by the Mad Mountain Stitchers, a group of highly-creative textile artists inspired by the unique collections in the National Monuments Record of Wales, will also be on display, including their wonderful wall hanging, Big Pit. The artists will also be on hand to talk about their work, and the materials and techniques used in their creation.

Throughout the afternoon and evening, visitors will have the opportunity to explore the vast range of the Royal Commission’s collections of photographs, maps, plans, drawings, texts, and other material in the National Monuments Record of Wales.

Visitors will be welcome to participate in workshops, working with students from Aberystwyth University’s School of Art to think creatively about using the archives to produce poetry, short stories, works of art, textiles, models, sculpture, knitting, cakes or anything else you feel inspired to produce.

Submission of work – having been inspired to create a piece of work in whatever medium – visual or written – please send us a digital version (photograph, recording, text document etc) by e-mail (nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk) together with the submission form before 17 January 2016. Submissions will form part of an online exhibition called the Inspirational Archives Collection on the People’s Collection Wales website where you will be able to view, comment and share. A selection will also be published by Planet and shown in an exhibition in the New Year – details to follow.

For further information, please contact the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, Plas Crug, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion SY23 1NJ, telephone: 01970 621200, email: nmr.wales@rcahmw.gov.uk

All are welcome. All events are free. Join us for the day and be inspired!


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Categories: Resources

Editorial

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 15:56
Categories: Resources

Negotiating the Past in the Present: Italian Prehistory, Civic Museums, and Curatorial Practice in Emilia-Romagna, Italy

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 15:56

The latter half of the nineteenth century witnessed the establishment of prehistoric archaeology as a scientific discipline in Italy, as well as the founding of the Italian nation state. Evolutionism, positivism, and a sense of national identity informed prehistoric research and the activities of individuals, such as Strobel, Pigorini, and Chierici, who are regarded today as the founding fathers of Italian prehistory. It is in this dynamic cultural and political climate that the civic museums of Reggio Emilia, Modena, and Bologna were created, both as a response to intense local archaeological activity and in reaction to the centralizing structure of the newly formed kingdom of Italy. These civic museums were among the first museums of prehistory in Italy and the products of the cultural and political climate of late nineteenth-century Europe. This article explores the circumstances surrounding the foundation of these museums and considers how the work of the first prehistorians and the museums’ own histories, as civic and cultural institutions, continues to affect their role and management in the present.

Categories: Resources

War Crime or Elite Burial: Interpretations of Human Skeletons Within the Late La Tene Settlement Basel-Gasfabrik, Basel, Switzerland

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 15:56

The case study presents completely different interpretations of the same archaeological evidence. Reasons for that are not only the state of knowledge and the possibilities of research, but also the impact of changes in the socio-political climate and varying theoretical traditions. The examples are taken from the Late La Tène settlement Basel-Gasfabrik, which has been excavated for almost 100 years. The study focuses on a number of more or less complete human skeletons from sunken features inside the settlement. This phenomenon prompted the archaeologists to find explanations for this apparent exception to the ancient rule of burying the dead outside the settlements. The interpretations of this ‘abnormal’ burial practice range from victims of war to burials of the members of the élite. The discussion continues on the basis of the synopsis of all verifiable options of dealing with the dead and includes evidence from similar sites elsewhere.

Categories: Resources

The Spatial Analysis of Non-Ceramic Refuse From the Neolithic Site At Bylany, Czech Republic

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 15:56

This article aims to provide an interpretation of the structure and spatial patterning of the non-ceramic refuse from the Neolithic site of Bylany. The data are considered at three levels: tackling questions of refuse management and deposition in the vicinity of houses; the spatial distribution of refuse within the settlement area as a whole; and the quantity and structure of non-ceramic refuse from a long-term settlement perspective. The analysed assemblage of non-ceramic finds is divided into five categories: chipped stone, polished stone, whetstones, manos/metates, and other stones without use-wear traces. The analysis is based on GIS and multivariate statistics. The spatial distribution and quantity of refuse are analysed with respect to space (in terms of proximity to Neolithic houses and the whole of the excavated settlement area) and time (the duration of settlement in six chronological stages). No deliberate pattern of refuse management was identified in the vicinity of the houses, but the refuse was found to have a tendency towards peripheral grouping within the settled area as a whole. Refuse quantity depends on the number of houses and settlement duration. The negative correlation between the mean density of non-ceramic artefacts per house and the number of houses in corresponding chronological stages may be explained by the interpretation that refuse was commonly deposited within abandoned houses, which would be consistent with ethnoarchaeological observations.

Categories: Resources

Discourses of Nature Conservation and Heritage Management in the Past, Present and Future: Discussing Heritage and Sustainable Development From Swedish Experiences

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 15:56

The relationship between heritage management and nature conservation in Sweden has changed over time, from an earlier division between the two sectors — with nature conservation attached to the growing movement of environmental politics — towards more integrated ways of working under the umbrella of sustainable development. As forests have been associated with nature, the earlier divide has been more evident with forested areas than agricultural areas, a view that has contributed to the marginalization of such landscapes and their inhabitants. With the more integrated policy, heritage management is drawn into the societal discourse of ecological modernization, where environmental and sustainability issues have become new business ideas and sources of further economic growth. From an ecological modernization perspective, nature and cultural heritage are today (touristic) commodities, enforcing the power of the urban world over the rural world and thus risk contributing to further marginalization of the inhabitants. However, heritage sites appear to function as boundary objects in local communities, and may thus function as meeting places and sources of enhancement of community pride. Therefore, we argue for community participation and public communication within the heritage sector, especially concerning marginalized, forested landscapes in order to contribute to an increased knowledge and understanding of the local heritage and history, thus opening the way for creative local processes.

Categories: Resources

Erratum

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 15:56
Categories: Resources
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