Resources

October 2011: Historic Seascape Characterisation, The Irish Sea (English sector)

Archaeology Data Service - Mon, 2011-10-31 15:45
The ADS, the University of Newcastle and English Heritage are pleased to announce the release of the Historic Seascape Characterisation: The Irish Sea (English sector) archive by Sam Turner, 2011. The project comprises a GIS-based historic seascape characterisation (HSC) of the English sector of the Irish Sea. HSC is guided by the same principles as Historic Landscape Characterisation, and is intended to inform coastal and marine management and planning, with particular reference to the role of English Heritage and its statutory responsibilities.
Categories: Resources

September 2011: Midlands ceramic project archive released

Archaeology Data Service - Tue, 2011-10-18 11:45
The ADS, Worcestershire Historic Environment, English Heritage and the Royal Archaeological Institute are pleased to announce the release of the Midlands purple and Cistercian-type wares in the west Midlands in the 15th-16th centuries by Susan M Wright, Derek Hurst, 2011. This project aimed to develop understanding of a major ceramics industry, its products being some of the commonest wares on late medieval to post-medieval (transitional) sites though it is an industry whose origins, dating and distribution are not sufficiently well understood.
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August 2011: Medieval Britain and Ireland database updated

Archaeology Data Service - Thu, 2011-10-06 12:45
This searchable on-line database of fieldwork summaries has just been updated to include data from fieldwork carried out in 2009. Individual database records link through to unpublished reports in our on-line library of grey literature reports where appropriate. Updates to the Post-Medieval Fieldwork in Britain and Northern Ireland database will follow shortly.
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August 2011: Southampton's Designated Archaeology Collections

Archaeology Data Service - Mon, 2011-10-03 12:45
Three new archives from excavations in Southampton have been added to this collection. The excavations were carried out in 2008 and 2009 by Thames Valley Archaeological Services and Southern Archaeological Services Ltd and cover sites at 20-26 College Street, Woolston Riverside and The 'Coach House' on Bevois Valley Road. Files available for download include reports, photographs and CAD diagrams.
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August 2011: Vernacular Architecture Group Bibliography and Cruck database updated

Archaeology Data Service - Mon, 2011-09-12 17:45
These two resources from the Vernacular Architecture Group have been updated with new data and revisions. Some interface changes have also been implemented in order to make the searchable databases easier to use.
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Editorial

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 16:56
Categories: Resources

Negotiating the Past in the Present: Italian Prehistory, Civic Museums, and Curatorial Practice in Emilia-Romagna, Italy

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 16:56

The latter half of the nineteenth century witnessed the establishment of prehistoric archaeology as a scientific discipline in Italy, as well as the founding of the Italian nation state. Evolutionism, positivism, and a sense of national identity informed prehistoric research and the activities of individuals, such as Strobel, Pigorini, and Chierici, who are regarded today as the founding fathers of Italian prehistory. It is in this dynamic cultural and political climate that the civic museums of Reggio Emilia, Modena, and Bologna were created, both as a response to intense local archaeological activity and in reaction to the centralizing structure of the newly formed kingdom of Italy. These civic museums were among the first museums of prehistory in Italy and the products of the cultural and political climate of late nineteenth-century Europe. This article explores the circumstances surrounding the foundation of these museums and considers how the work of the first prehistorians and the museums’ own histories, as civic and cultural institutions, continues to affect their role and management in the present.

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War Crime or Elite Burial: Interpretations of Human Skeletons Within the Late La Tene Settlement Basel-Gasfabrik, Basel, Switzerland

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 16:56

The case study presents completely different interpretations of the same archaeological evidence. Reasons for that are not only the state of knowledge and the possibilities of research, but also the impact of changes in the socio-political climate and varying theoretical traditions. The examples are taken from the Late La Tène settlement Basel-Gasfabrik, which has been excavated for almost 100 years. The study focuses on a number of more or less complete human skeletons from sunken features inside the settlement. This phenomenon prompted the archaeologists to find explanations for this apparent exception to the ancient rule of burying the dead outside the settlements. The interpretations of this ‘abnormal’ burial practice range from victims of war to burials of the members of the élite. The discussion continues on the basis of the synopsis of all verifiable options of dealing with the dead and includes evidence from similar sites elsewhere.

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The Spatial Analysis of Non-Ceramic Refuse From the Neolithic Site At Bylany, Czech Republic

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 16:56

This article aims to provide an interpretation of the structure and spatial patterning of the non-ceramic refuse from the Neolithic site of Bylany. The data are considered at three levels: tackling questions of refuse management and deposition in the vicinity of houses; the spatial distribution of refuse within the settlement area as a whole; and the quantity and structure of non-ceramic refuse from a long-term settlement perspective. The analysed assemblage of non-ceramic finds is divided into five categories: chipped stone, polished stone, whetstones, manos/metates, and other stones without use-wear traces. The analysis is based on GIS and multivariate statistics. The spatial distribution and quantity of refuse are analysed with respect to space (in terms of proximity to Neolithic houses and the whole of the excavated settlement area) and time (the duration of settlement in six chronological stages). No deliberate pattern of refuse management was identified in the vicinity of the houses, but the refuse was found to have a tendency towards peripheral grouping within the settled area as a whole. Refuse quantity depends on the number of houses and settlement duration. The negative correlation between the mean density of non-ceramic artefacts per house and the number of houses in corresponding chronological stages may be explained by the interpretation that refuse was commonly deposited within abandoned houses, which would be consistent with ethnoarchaeological observations.

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Discourses of Nature Conservation and Heritage Management in the Past, Present and Future: Discussing Heritage and Sustainable Development From Swedish Experiences

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 16:56

The relationship between heritage management and nature conservation in Sweden has changed over time, from an earlier division between the two sectors — with nature conservation attached to the growing movement of environmental politics — towards more integrated ways of working under the umbrella of sustainable development. As forests have been associated with nature, the earlier divide has been more evident with forested areas than agricultural areas, a view that has contributed to the marginalization of such landscapes and their inhabitants. With the more integrated policy, heritage management is drawn into the societal discourse of ecological modernization, where environmental and sustainability issues have become new business ideas and sources of further economic growth. From an ecological modernization perspective, nature and cultural heritage are today (touristic) commodities, enforcing the power of the urban world over the rural world and thus risk contributing to further marginalization of the inhabitants. However, heritage sites appear to function as boundary objects in local communities, and may thus function as meeting places and sources of enhancement of community pride. Therefore, we argue for community participation and public communication within the heritage sector, especially concerning marginalized, forested landscapes in order to contribute to an increased knowledge and understanding of the local heritage and history, thus opening the way for creative local processes.

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Erratum

European Journal of Archaeology - Tue, 2010-12-21 16:56
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