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Archaeology

The voice of archaeology in Britain and beyond

Cover of British Archaeology 107

Issue 107

July / August 2009

Contents

news

Scottish dig has big surprise in the post

Urine to navel fluff: the first complete witch bottle

Celtic tankard adds value to Welsh treasure

In the press

In Brief & Phase 2

features

on the web

Recommended websites
Websites of univeristy archaeology departments and a community site for Digging Vindolanda.

letters

your views and responses

CBA Correspondent

Some recent projects benefiting from Challenge Funding.

my archaeology

Simon McBurney is a writer and actor; his father, archaeologist Charles

 

ISSN 1357-4442

Editor Mike Pitts

Issue 107, July / August 2009

contents

news

All the latest archaeology news from around the country

features

Finding Lindow Man

Britain's only surviving "bog body" was found in Cheshire 25 years ago. With photos taken at the time – some not seen before – Rick Turner remembers the day when saving Lindow Man was entirely in his hands

The Devil's Work

There were once striking prehistoric ritual monuments beside the Thames in Oxfordshire. But quarrying, an airfield and centuries of farming all but wiped them from the map

THE BIG DIG: Hambledon Hill

Earthwork enclosures with a seemingly unnecessary number of causeways across their ditches have long been attributed to Britain's earliest farming era, dating back to 4000BC. Yet their purpose remains obscure.

on the web

Caroline Wickham-Jones looks at the websites of univeristy archaeology departments, and a community site for Digging Vindolanda

letters

Your views and responses

CBA Correspondent

Mike Heyworth introduces some recent projects benefiting from Challenge Funding

my archaeology

Simon McBurney is a writer and actor; his father, archaeologist Charles

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Stone Age man was fitter, faster and leaner than his modern counterpart, and he lived a healthier and far more natural life, before dieing at the age of 19.
Dr Hilary Edmund advocates a stone age diet of meat, fish, fruit and raw vegetables on the satirical Sunday Supplement, Radio 4 February 4 2004

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