British Archaeology banner

Cover of British Archaeology Issue 64

Issue 64

April 2002

Contents

news

Anglo-Saxon 'planned town' revealed this month in Whitby

Mesolithic camp found at bottom of the Solent

Sacred pool ringed by toem poles in Scotland's ritual glen

Prehistoric bunker guards its secrets to the very end

Finds from Chester: an elephant's leg to Jupiter's face

In Brief

features

Guns of the Armada
Colin Martin on the results of excavating Armada wrecks

Invisible Vikings
Dawn Hadley on how the Danish settlers became English

Great sites
Peter Rowley-Conwy on the Neolithic house at Balbridie

letters

On Roulston Scar, small finds, grave goods and boiled bones

issues

George Lambrick on new developments at Stonehenge

Peter Ellis

Regular column

books

Dangerous Energy by Wayne Cocroft

Bloody Marsh by Peter Warner

Vernacular Buildings in a Changing World edited by Sarah Pearson & Bob Meeson

Dying for the Gods by Miranda Aldhouse Green

The Vikings in Wales by Mark Redknap

CBA update

favourite finds

Gwilym Hughes on a piece of Ming china found in Africa

 

ISSN 1357-4442

Editor Simon Denison

Issue 64 April 2002

contents

news

All the latest archaeology news from around the country.

features

Guns of the Armada

Archaeology shows the 1588 Armada failed partly because Spanish guns were no good, writes Colin Martin

Invisible Vikings

How much did the impact of Viking customs change English ways of life? Less than you might think, explains Dawn Hadley

Great Sites: Balbridie

For years, very few Neolithic settlements were known in Britain. Perhaps the ‘first farmers’ were a myth? Then a Neolithic ‘house’ full of grain was found near Aberdeen. Peter Rowley-Conwy reports

letters

Views and responses.

issues

Plans for improving Stonehenge are still far from complete, warns George Lambrick

Peter Ellis

Our regular columnist.

books

All the latest books on archaeology in Britain reviewed.

CBA update

Campaigns and reports from the CBA.

favourite finds

Ming pottery in an African sun. Gwilym Hughes recalls finding a broken Chinese platter at Great Zimbabwe

Please use the lefthand menu to navigate this issue of British Archaeology

Please use the righthand menu to access Briefing, other issues of British Archaeology or return to the CBA homepage

CBA web:

British Archaeology

Jan/Feb 2005
Mar/Apr 2005
May/Jun 2005
Jul/Aug 2005
Sep/Oct 2005
Nov/Dec 2005
Jan/Feb 2006
Mar/Apr 2006
May/Jun 2006
Jul/Aug 2006
Sep/Oct 2006
Nov/Dec 2006
Jan/Feb 2007
Mar/Apr 2007
May/Jun 2007
Jul/Aug 2007
Sep/Oct 2007
Nov/Dec 2007
Jan/Feb 2008
Mar/Apr 2008
May/Jun 2008
Jul/Aug 2008
Sep/Oct 2008
Nov/Dec 2008
Jan/Feb 2009
Mar/Apr 2009
May/Jun 2009
Jul/Aug 2009
Sep/Oct 2009
Nov/Dec 2009
Jan/Feb 2010
Mar/Apr 2010
May/Jun 2010
Jul/Aug 2010
Sep/Oct 2010
Nov/Dec 2010
Jan/Feb 2011
Mar/Apr 2011
May/Jun 2011
Jul/Aug 2011
Sep/Oct 2011
Nov/Dec 2011
Jan/Feb 2012
Mar/Apr 2012

CBA Briefing

Fieldwork
Conferences
Noticeboard
Courses & lectures
CBA Network
Grants & awards

CBA homepage