Scottish Burgh Surveys

Archaeology and Development

M Rorke, D Gallagher, C McKean, E Patricia Dennison and G Ewart

This survey gives an accessible and broad-ranging synthesis of the history and archaeology of Galashiels, and aims to pose questions for further investigation.

Historic Galashiels cover

Nestled into a narrow valley, part in Roxburghshire and part in Selkirkshire, Galashiels owes its development to the Gala Water which provided an ideal source of power for the mills of the woollen industry, while the farms in the surrounding hills initially provided the wool.

Archaeology and Development

RD Oram, PF Martin, CA McKean, T Neighbour, A Cathcart

This survey gives an accessible and broad-ranging synthesis of the history and archaeology of Fraserburgh, and aims to inform conservation guidance for future development.

Historic Fraserburgh Situated on an exposed headland on the north-east coast of Scotland, the historic burgh of Fraserburgh, dating from the late sixteenth century, is the earliest of Scotland’s ‘new towns’. It was unique for the time in being laid out on a grid, unlike other new towns of the period such as neighbouring Peterhead. The town’s origins lie in the medieval settlements of Faithlie and Broadsea down by the shore, but it takes it name from the landowner: it was Fraser’s broch (burgh). The new town was laid out on top of a headland, with the principal thoroughfare, Broad Street, tightly closed at each end to shelter from the wind.

Archaeology and Development

RD Oram, PF Martin, CA McKean, T Neighbour

This survey gives an accessible and broad-ranging synthesis of the history and archaeology of Whithorn and the nearby Isle of Whithorn, and aims to inform conservation guidance for future development.

Historic Whithorn cover Situated at a southern tip of Galloway, in the old county of Wigtownshire, the historic burgh of Whithorn is one of the oldest Christian sites in the UK. The origins of the settlement date back to the mid-fifth century AD and the first monastery may have been founded in the sixth century. Traditionally the monastery is the burial place of St Ninian. By the tenth or eleventh century a town-like settlement had developed around the monastic site and in 1312–15 this was relocated to the line of what is now George Street. At around the same time the community was created a burgh of barony for the prior of Whithorn. Pilgrimage was a very profitable activity for the town and the nearby settlement of Isle of Whithorn, a port for pilgrims and goods.

Archaeology and Development

by Chris Dalglish and Stephen T Driscoll

With contributions by Irene Maver, Norman F Shead and Ingrid Shearer

This survey gives an accessible and broad-ranging synthesis of the history and archaeology of Govan, and aims to inform conservation guidance for future development.

Govan Cover Situated on the south bank of the river Clyde, just to the west of Glasgow, Govan to most people is synonymous with shipbuilding and social deprivation. Govan is, however, a remarkable place, with a history stretching back to the fifth or sixth century AD when it was a seat of royal and religious power. The church of Govan Old stands upon one of the oldest Christian sites in western Scotland. A key factor in its history has been its location at a major river crossing, where the Kelvin joins the Clyde, and the book also considers the role of Partick on the opposite bank in the medieval period.

Archaeology and Development

by M Rorke, EP Dennison, Simon Stronach, and Russel Coleman

Historic Kirkintilloch This survey offers an accessible and broad-ranging synthesis of the history and archaeology of Kirkintilloch, Dunbartonshire, and aims to inform conservation guidance for future development.

Kirkintilloch lies at a key point in Scotland’s central belt. Here, by accident of geography, the Antonine Wall, ancient and modern route ways and the Forth and Clyde Canal pass within yards of each other. Here also, iron founding was added to the linen and cotton weaving industry giving Kirkintilloch an important role in Scotland’s nineteenth-century economic development.

Archaeology and Development

by RD Oram, PF Martin, CA McKean, T Neighbour and A Cathcart

Historic Taincover Situated in Easter Ross and overlooking the Dornoch Firth, the historic burgh of Tain developed as a pilgrimage destination in the fourteenth century. Tain lay at the centre of an ‘Immunity’ around the shrine of St Duthac, where sanctuary could be sought. Both King James II and James III made pilgrimages to the shrine, and in 1588 its status as a royal burgh was confirmed.

Archaeology and Development

by E Patricia Dennison, Simon Stronach & Russel Coleman

Historic Barrhead cover Situated to the west of Glasgow in East Renfrewshire, Barrhead grew rapidly in the late 18th century because it was in the right place, at the right time. It was close to the emerging commercial centres of Glasgow and Paisley and could rely on the Levern Water to power a booming textile industry. The valley in which the town grew also has a rich earlier history.

Archaeology and Development

by E Patricia Dennison, Dennis Gallagher & Gordon Ewart

Historic Mauchline cover Mauchline first appeared in the historical record in the 12th century, when it was granted to the Cistercian abbey of Melrose. It served as the administrative centre of a monastic estate until the Reformation and the 15th-century Abbot Hunters Tower still stands in the heart of the medieval town as testament to its importance in this era.

Archaeology and Development

by E Patricia Dennison, Simon Stronach & Russel Coleman

Historic Dunbar cover Strategically positioned on the coastal strip between Berwick and Edinburgh, Dunbar has had a colourful history, with a sequence of fortification and settlement from the Iron Age onwards.

Archaeology and Development

by E Patricia Dennison, Dennis Gallagher, Gordon Ewart & Laura Stewart

Historic Kilsyth cover The historic town of Kilsyth is situated in the Kelvin valley in North Lanarkshire.

Archaeology and Development

by E Patricia Dennison, Dennis Gallagher & Gordon Ewart

Historic Maybole cover The historic town of Maybole lies equidistant from the burghs of Ayr and Girvan in South Ayrshire. There is evidence of an early Anglian settlement and in the Middle Ages Maybole developed into an important economic, ecclesiastical and political centre.